Beacon Unit Plan Library

Unit Plans - Learner Level 2: Social Studies


  • A Colony Is Born (Authored by Katie Koehnemann.)

  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Social Studies (Grade 3 - Grade 5)
    Description: What influenced the early colonists to make the decision to settle in the New World? What difficulties did they encounter and how were they able to rise above the adversities to secure a strong foundation for our great nation? Come explore Colonial America through the building of timelines and investigating primary and secondary sources. This study of significant events in the colonization of North America and the aspects of everyday life in Colonial America is designed for students to gather, record, and organize their own Colonial Notebook. Students will take on the role of colonist in a given region and work with other 'colonists' of the same region to develop a report and presentation. The study will take students through the life and times of those early settlers and will have them preparing a colonial meal representative of their region of focus.

  • In Days of Old, Before Columbus (Authored by Sandi King.)

  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies (Grade 3 - Grade 5)
    Description: In Days of Old, Before Columbus introduces third graders to developments in history prior to the Renaissance with focus on 12th century Europe (1200-1300). Students will be actively involved in learning about the feudal system of government and aspects of family life in the different classes within this system. Students will learn about early transportation and communication and how they affected the lives of the people. Students will explore trade, cultural and intellectual achievements, and scientific and technological advancements of the time. Time lines will be built and used extensively as a visual assistant to students.

  • Independent - To Be or Not To Be (Authored by Katie Koehnemann.)

  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Social Studies (Grade 3 - Grade 5)
    Description: British in their language, their laws, their customs, could the American colonists fight a war with England, their Mother Country? Why were freedom and independence so important? Take students on a journey through the historical events leading to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. This unit is designed for students to learn to make judgments and decisions based on facts, and to use informational and imaginative speech to present their personal viewpoint and opinion to others. Students experience, first hand, taxation without representation, and will develop a very real sense for the need to preserve the inherent freedoms of man. Using the American flag as a graphic organizer, students will develop a clear understanding of the actions and reactions of the American colonists to British rule and to our most important national holiday, the 4th of July. Historically significant events will be studied and organized through exploration of facts and opinions and interaction with informational text and class discussion. The unit is presented in Reading Block Framework design with integrated lessons throughout each day. There are two types of lessons in this unit. First there are numbered lessons (1,2,3, etc.). Most often, these are the lessons where the content area standards are taught. The second set of lessons is identified with letters (A, B, C, etc.). Most often, these are the lessons where the speaking standards are taught. Although this is the general rule of thumb, the learning of all the standards is intricately infused in all lessons.

  • Inventions and Inventors (Authored by Laurie Ayers.)

  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Science, Social Studies (Grade 3 - Grade 5)
    Description: In this unit, students use a variety of references to read and organize information and demonstrate knowledge of selected significant people, their contributions to society, and ways the contributions impacted society. Contributions in the fields of communication and technology and significant scientific discoveries are explored. Timeline activities are included to promote understanding of order of events.

  • We the People (Authored by Sandi King.)

  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies (Grade 3 - Grade 5)
    Description: What are the rights and responsibilities of citizenship? Who are your state and local elected officials? Which officials can you turn to for help? This integrated unit uses reading strategies, reflection activities, graphic organizers, and technology tools to teach the rights and responsibilities of citizens. The US and Florida constitutions are examined to document the purpose, structure, and responsibilities of the branches of government and those elected officials who serve in them.

  • Where's the Heart of Florida? (Authored by Julie Thompson.)

  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies (Grade 3 - Grade 5)
    Description: Should the capital of the state of Florida remain where it is in the 21st century? Would another location better represent the "heart of Florida?" In this Problem-Based Learning (PBL) unit, students engage in an authentic setting to research the history of the current state capital and examine the possibility of a new location for the state capital that perhaps better reflects the changing face of Florida, politically, economically, culturally, socially, and geographically. Charged by the governor in this simulation, students act as a task force to inquire and propose possible sites as the "heart of Florida" capital of the twenty-first century according to the stated criteria.

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